Lola Mk6 GT chassis LGT-P

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Chassis LGT-P was the original Mk6 GT prototype. It was the only Mk6 GT built with a steel as opposed to aluminium monocoque.

Lola took it to Olympia in January 1963 for the London Racing Car Show but at this stage it had not been fitted with a functional drivetrain. Equipped as a road car with vivid turquoise seats to match the unusually coloured chassis, a 4.2-litre Ford V8 with single Holley carb was subsequently installed.

The low-slung silver Lola then made the Mk6 GT’s competition debut when it appeared at the Silverstone International Trophy for GT and Sports cars on May 11th. John Surtees drove the car in practice but was outlawed from racing it by his employers at Ferrari. Tony Maggs stepped in at the last moment and started from the back of the grid; he had never even sat in the car before the race began. At an average speed of around 100mph Maggs progressed up the 43-car field to eventually finish ninth overall and fifth in the over two-litre class.

One week later LGT-P was entered for the Nurburgring 1000km World Sportscar Championship event. Maggs was co-driven by Bob Olthoff and the Lola qualified a reasonable ninth. The race proved a disappointment though as Maggs had to stop at the end of the first lap for the rear wheel nuts to be tightened up. He then retired on lap four with a broken distributor.

After its appearance at the Nurburgring LGT-P was retired from competition duty as the two new cars with aluminium monocoques were nearing completion (LGT-1 and LGT-2).

Following LGT-1’s performance at Le Mans in June the Ford Motor Company purchased it along with LGT-P to act as mobile test beds for what would become the GT40. Ford had failed in their quest to buy Ferrari and were planning a Sports car programme of their own. They considered the Mk6 GT to be the perfect foundation and Eric Broadley was given a two-year deal to work as part of the GT40 design team.

However, Broadly quit the project after 12 months and received LGT-P as part of his settlement.

It was then stored back at the Lola factory in Slough where in May 1965 it was spotted by Shelby American racing driver, Allen Grant. Grant was in England working for Shelby at Ford Advanced Vehicles (FAV). The FAV operation was on the same industrial estate as Lola. Grant spotted the Mk6 GT under cover in the corner of the Lola factory and struck a deal with Broadley to buy it for $3000. Allen Grant has owned it ever since.

Notable History

Lola Cars

Silver with Turquoise interior

01/1963 London Racing Car Show

11/05/1963 IND Silverstone International Trophy (T. Maggs) 9th oa, 5th S2.0+ class (#48)
19/05/1963 WSC Nurburgring 1000km (T. Maggs / B. Olthoff) DNF (#115)

Purchased by Ford Motor Company for GT40 testing and development

1964 returned to Eric Broadly as part of his settlement from Ford

May 1965 sold to Allen Grant, USA

Text copyright: Supercar Nostalgia
Photo copyright: Lola Heritage -
http://www.lolaheritage.co.uk